Fermented Vegetables FAQs

Fermented Vegetables FAQs 

Vegetables

  • Can I use less than a full sachet of starter culture for fermenting smaller quantities of vegetables? Yes, just use the amount of starter culture that you need, and remember to adjust the salt in proportion to the recipe as well. Keep the remaining powder in the sachet, close it well, and store it in the freezer for future use.
  • I live in a hot place. Is the starter still active by the time it gets to me, if it was shipped during hot weather? Yes. Our starters are designed to stay fully active in transit, even in warm weather, without the need for express shipping or refrigeration. The formula and the packaging combine to protect the live strains. When your order is shipped, we send you the tracking number so that you can see when it is due to arrive. Once received, the starter should be refrigerated for the long term.
  • My vegetables are rising in the jar. Is this okay? Yes, this is perfectly normal and expected. Fermented vegetables should rise and expand as they culture, and you’ll find that they can often be very bubbly.
  • Can cultured vegetables develop botulism? No. Botulism is an issue with canned goods and not cultured foods. The healthy bacteria in cultured foods prevent botulism from surviving.
  • Can I use metal utensils and lids to handle ferments? Overall yes, because the metal used in utensils and food-grade lids is most probably acid-resistant, and the utensil is not going to touch the ferment for that long. Metal lids can be used provided that they are acid-resistant and do not directly touch the fermented product for an extended period of time. Opt for the type of lids with a waxy interior, used for pickles, for example. If that interior is corroded though, better not use them. Also: the jar should not be full all the way to the top, to avoid direct contact between the ferment and the lid.
  • How long do I culture my vegetables on the kitchen counter? Can I leave them longer? For most vegetables, culturing takes 7 to 10 days at room temperature. The vegetables will continue to ferment after you place them in the fridge, but at a slower rate.
  • How long can I store my cultured veggies? In the refrigerator, cultured veggies will keep for up to nine months, and sometimes longer.
  • Why aren’t my vegetables crunchy? Salt is the key. Vegetables without salt become soft and slimy. Vegetables made with salt will stay crunchy.
  • Can these foods be stored out of the fridge after they have been fermented? Technically, cultured vegetables can be stored in a cooler basement or cold cellar. However, they will continue to ferment, and in short order they won’t taste very good.
  • How will I know if my vegetables are properly fermented? They will taste sour and the liquid they are in will look bubbly. If your culturing has gone wrong, you will know this by the strong, unappetizing odor the veggies will give off.
  • What are the white spots on my veggies? This is called Kahm yeast. This yeast is not harmful. It may adversely affect flavor but it won’t hurt you. Not using the freshest vegetables seems to be one of the fastest ways for Kahm yeast to appear.
  • What do I do if the liquid is leaking from the jar while my veggies culture? If your jar is too full, the brine might leak out. Simply open the jar, push the veggies down so they are fully covered, and remove a little bit of the liquid or some of the veggies.
  • What's the best way to store the starter culture? Store the starter culture either in the refrigerator or in the freezer.
  • Should I use some of the water from my previous batch of fermented veggies as a starter for my next batch? This method is not recommended in the case of fermented vegetables. The strains in the original starter do not all survive the acidity of the more advanced phases of the fermentation process (which they helped achieve). We recommend using a sachet (or sachets) of starter culture for each batch.

Fermented vegetables starter