Yogurt Plus FAQs

  • What kind of milk should I use? Any type of pasteurized dairy milk, such as skim, 1%, 2%, whole milk, or half and half. Goat milk may yield thin results.
  • Can I use raw milk? No. It contains competing bacteria.
  • How can I make my yogurt thicker? There are several ways to improve the thickness of the yogurt. Whole milk or adding a little cream can make your yogurt thicker. But don’t use all cream as this doesn’t have enough lactose for the bacteria to form yogurt. You can add a tablespoon of powdered milk for every 8 fluid ounces of milk to help make it thicker. Heating the milk to high temperatures of 160-180°F and holding it there for 20 minutes denatures the proteins, allowing them to form a stronger curd. A higher temperature, held for a longer time, will give you a firmer yogurt. You can also strain it. (Keep the whey)
  • How long will the finished yogurt last in my refrigerator? In the refrigerator, it should last 7-10 days to allow you to re-culture another batch. It should stay edible for 2-3 weeks
  • Can I make larger quantities? Absolutely! Save time by making larger quantities. Remember to keep the ratios in proportion. For example, to make 2 quarts, double the quantities of all the ingredients; to make 3 quarts, triple the quantities, etc.
  • Can I use more than 1 sachet of starter culture? Only if you’re making larger quantities (see question on larger quantities), otherwise you'll be crowding the bacteria. 
  • Can I use my yogurt to revive another culture (such as milk kefir)? No, combining different cultures leads to competition between bacteria. The different bacteria will want to dominate and can kill each other.
  • The Yogurt Plus starter contains L. Reuteri bacteria. Why do we ferment at standard yogurt-maker temperatures, if L. Reuteri is heat-sensitive? The standard yogurt-maker temperatures are necessary for the other bacteria in the starter. While slightly higher than ideal L. Reuteri temperatures, these are still within survivability range for the L. Reuteri, given the short fermentation time (less than a quarter of L. Reuteri Superfood fermentation time which is 36 hours). If you have the option, set the temperature not higher than 106 F. If not, just use the standard yogurt-maker settings.
  • Is the temperature important when culturing yogurt? Yes. Stay within the recommended range of 100°F to 110°F. Too warm and the bacteria will die. Too cool and the culturing will halt, and will likely not start again, resulting in a thin end-product that is not fully fermented.
  • Why do I have to heat pasteurized milk when using the culture? Heating the milk to 180°F will kill any bacteria present in the milk that might compete with the bacteria in the culture. It will also help denature the protein to form a thicker curd. The goal is to destroy unwanted bacteria that could prevent the yogurt from setting or that could grow beside the good bacteria contained in the starter.
  • Can I make yogurt without a starter culture? No, either a yogurt starter culture or some previously-made live yogurt is required in order to make yogurt.
  • What is a starter culture? A starter culture is a blend of bacteria that starts the culturing process, lowers the pH of the milk, and gives the resulting yogurt its tangy taste and firmer texture.
  • How long does an unopened sachet of starter culture keep in the refrigerator? The Best By date is printed on each pouch and on each sachet. Please keep the starter culture refrigerated for optimal shelf life.
  • Can I make yogurt without a yogurt maker? You will need a reliable method of keeping the temperature at a constant temperature of 100°F to 110°F. You could try using a sous vide device or an Instant Pot.
  • What should I do if the yogurt slightly curdles or if the whey separates from the curds? No problem! The yogurt is still good, just stir it to achieve a more even consistency.
  • How does the fat content of the milk affect the yogurt? There's a direct correlation between the fat content of the milk that you use, and the creaminess of the resulting yogurt. Whole milk with a higher fat content will result in a rich, creamy yogurt; skim milk will produce a much less creamy texture.
  • Can I use metal utensils and lids to handle ferments? Overall yes, because the metal used in utensils and food-grade lids is most probably acid-resistant, and the utensil is not going to touch the ferment for that long. Metal lids can be used provided that they are acid-resistant and do not directly touch the fermented product for an extended period of time. Opt for the type of lids with a waxy interior, used for pickles, for example. If that interior is corroded though, better not use them. Also: the jar should not be full all the way to the top, to avoid direct contact between the ferment and the lid. There's no problem using stainless steel in the preparation stage, before fermenting.
  • When should I add flavorings such as fruit, sweeteners, etc.? Add these after the yogurt is fermented or before consumption.
  • Why is the starter shipped without ice? See answer to "I live in a hot place. Is the starter still active after being shipped unrefrigerated in hot weather?"
  • I live in a hot place. Is the starter still active after being shipped unrefrigerated in hot weather? Yes. Our starters are designed to remain active for well over a week in non-refrigerated transit in warm weather, without the need for express shipping or ice. The formula and the packaging provide excellent protection for the live strains. For this reason, we use ambient shipping (which is also significantly less costly for the customer). The starters are kept cold in our warehouse until your order is ready for shipping, and when your order is shipped, we send you the tracking number so that you can see when it is due to arrive. Once received, the starter should be refrigerated (or frozen). 
  • What are the starter's caloric/nutrition facts? These are printed on the back of the pouch. But overall, our starters contain such minuscule quantities of powder, that they are too tiny to have any impact on the end-product's caloric values. Our starters come in sachets of 1g - 3g of powder (depending on the starter), most of which, apart from the live strains, is either a carrier fiber containing no caloric value, or a trace of a natural sugar containing only a negligible value. When these teensy quantities of 1g - 3g are added to a quart of dairy, the starter's original caloric values, if ever there were any, become entirely diluted in the overall mass, and are practically non-detectable. The end-product's nutritional values of calories/fats/carbs etc., come directly from the dairy that the starter was added to, not from the starter itself. For example, if you use half-and-half, it will add more fat to your end-product than skim milk. 

Yogurt Plus